Sunday, November 19, 2017

The Dinosaur Lawyer



Attorney Aaron Baker is retained by billionaire Roman Aristov to make the case that big dinosaurs never existed. Initially drawn by the money to take the losing side of a case, Aaron slowly starts to believe the unbelievable. The Brachiosaurus, Tyrannosaurus-Rex, and all big dinosaurs never existed. While discovering holes in dinosaur theory, Aaron fears his client is hiding something that could impact his case and career. 

Take your spot in the jury box to see if Aaron Baker can make the case that big dinosaurs never existed and discover what secrets his client is keeping from him in this courtroom drama.





Saturday, November 18, 2017

Epiphany



Rosetta Melki (part-time tarot reader, struggling sole parent and full-time idealist) begins a reading group to examine a fantasy novel and discovers the book to be anything but fiction.

The book, written in the 1770s by Edward Lillibridge, is a hidden history that reveals the true beginnings of the global monetary system. Lillibridge’s story surrounds ancients from a gold-obsessed empire and the sprites they oppress: elfin clan dwellers whose currency of choice is kindness.

Whether discontent in rich and poor will ever make way for a world free of war and poverty, whether anyone can believe enough in humanity’s true ancient history to activate the dawn of a benevolent new era, remains to be seen. One thing, however, is certain. Someone in modern times must fulfil a prophecy. The time-crossing sprites of Lillibridge’s descriptions have set their sights on Rosetta, but first they must ensure she meets her one true love. Feet-on-the-ground finance executive Matthew Weissler is hardly a likely candidate -- even less so after their klutzy introduction. He’s polished, successful, admired, and is disturbed to find he’s being shadowed by an elf.








Friday, November 17, 2017

American Justice on Trial



As I write this, the nation is still reeling from multiple shocks in July 2016. First, as the month began, came yet two more videotaped incidents of police shooting to death black arrestees after many other such widely-publicized incidents over the previous several years. The day after the Fourth of July holiday, disturbing footage went viral of Baton Rouge police outside a convenience store firing repeatedly at 37-year-old Alton Sterling while two white policemen already had Sterling pinned face down on the ground. A day later, a thousand miles away in a suburb of St. Paul, Minnesota, the quick-thinking girl friend of Philandro Castile used her cell phone to capture a local policeman still waving his gun outside Castile’s car window as Castile lay bleeding to death seated beside her following a traffic stop. This graphic image was followed within days by breaking news of a horrific sniper attack on Dallas policemen who were monitoring one of many Black Lives Matter protest rallies prompted by the deaths of Sterling and Castile. Then, on July 17, 2016 came another attack, this time on Baton Rouge police. 

The carnage and proliferation of demonstrations and hostile reactions in the aftermath have drawn renewed national focus to fractured police-community relations in cities across country, the very issue that gave rise to the Black Panther Party a half century ago. Indeed, the day after video footage went viral of Castile dying from gunshot wounds following a traffic stop, AlterNet reporter Alexandra Rosenmann drew a direct comparison to the sensationalized 1968 murder trial of Panther Party co-founder Huey Newton. Rosenmann titled her web article, “Gun Rights, Police Brutality and the Case of the Century: Philandro Castile’s tragic case of police brutality pulls one of the most famous cases back into focus.”1  
The two incidents did start out in similar ways. In the early morning of October 28, 1967, Oakland policeman John Frey stopped the car Newton was driving to write a ticket for an unpaid traffic fine. A shootout ensued that left Officer Frey dead and Newton and a back-up officer seriously wounded. Newton claimed to have been unarmed and the victim of an abusive arrest; no gun belonging to Newton was found. His death penalty trial the following summer drew international attention to whether any black man could get a fair trial in America. 
Before the deadly July 2016 incidents occurred, interviewees for this book had already noted the remarkable relevance of the 1968 Newton case to current events. Among them is William “Bill” Patterson, a former President of the Oakland NAACP and the first black foreman of the Alameda County Grand Jury: “It does resonate today. A young man [Oscar Grant III] being killed in the BART station by BART police and how that played out. The Florida case . . . again another young man [Trayvon Martin] shot to death. These situations continue to emerge and if we are not careful, we will find history repeating itself.”
In the past several months, both champions and critics of the Black Lives Matter movement have drawn parallels to the split among Americans in the turbulent 1960s. The comparisons reached a point where President Obama felt compelled to reassure the world, on July 9, 2016, that most Americans are not as divided as we were fifty years ago: “When we start suggesting that somehow, there’s this enormous polarization and we’re back to the situation in the ’60s, that’s just not true. You’re not seeing riots, and you’re not seeing police going after people who are protesting peacefully. . . . We’ve got a foundation to build on . . .” 
President Obama himself symbolizes the profound change in the fabric of our nation over the past half century. So, too, do black police chiefs like Dallas Police Chief David Brown. Chief Brown’s reaction to a black gunman ambushing randomly chosen white officers on the evening of July 7, 2016, captured the sentiments of most Americans: “We are heartbroken....







Friday, November 3, 2017

Weeds In Nana's Garden



A young girl and her Nana hold a special bond that blooms in the surroundings of Nana’s magical garden. Then one day, the girl finds many weeds in the garden. She soon discovers that her beloved Nana has Alzheimer’s Disease; an illness that affects an adult brain with tangles that get in the way of thoughts, kind of like how weeds get in the way of flowers. As time passes, the weeds grow thicker and her Nana declines, but the girl accepts the difficult changes with love, and learns to take-over as the magical garden’s caregiver. Extending from the experience of caring for her mother, artist Kathryn Harrison has created this poignant story with rich illustrations to candidly explore dementia diseases, while demonstrating the power of love. It is a journey that will cultivate understanding and touch your heart. After the story, a useful Question and Answer section is included. 20% of the proceeds from the purchase of this book will be donated to the Alzheimer Society of Canada. The Alzheimer Society is Canada’s leading health charity for people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.





Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Catching The Last Tram



Beth’s commute could lead to love – unless mysterious forces win.

After moving house, lonely librarian Beth meets Isaac – a handsome man with timeless manners – on her way to work. Sharing the same antiquated tram day after day, the pair become close and Beth suspects she’s falling in love.

But Isaac has a secret that threatens their budding romance. Something dark and as magical as the tram that picks her up every morning and evening.

Why does he suddenly push her away? Does he really not care for her? How could she have got the signals so wrong?

Then Isaac and the tram go missing and Beth begins to discover the truth. But it might be too late…




Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Lineage



"Cameron, why do you call me dove," I asked, ready for disappointment.
"Because, you bring my soul peace."

Joey Morris has spent her young life moving around the country with her constantly absent mother until finally ending up in the small college town of Portstown, Pennsylvania. Here history is thick in the air and Joey discovers that her family has long reaching roots in the town, dating back to the very first settlement. Because of her heritage she is welcomed into the group of the other founding families, and quickly becomes one of the popular girls in school.

After over a year of the good life and Homecoming just days away, Joey is thrown into a terrifying new reality. Happening across a violent black dog with glowing red eyes, and a handsome stranger that puts his life on the line to save her only to stick a gun in her chest moments later. 

Now people are dying in Portstown, people close to Joey and she doesn't understand why. Will Joey have anyone left after she discovers the truth about her past?

Cameron Davis is a man from another life, for years he has been focused on his mission. The drive that keeps his soul locked inside a physical body, staving off the reaper. That all changes when he is given the task of protecting Joey and stopping the attacks. 

This girl makes him weak and brings up memories of a past he left behind nearly a century ago. What secrets lie beyond his contract with the elusive Warner family, and why does this girl need protecting?

Lineage is a young adult novel but is recommended for readers 16+ due to violence.